Vietnam

2014 Trade and Investment Profile


In recent years, Vietnam’s economic growth has slowed, and single-digit inflation has prevailed. Tight economic policies have helped stabilise the fiscal deficit, and generate a current account surplus. Vietnam needs to accelerate economic restructuring, particularly reforms in the banking sector and to state-owned enterprises. Despite remarkable achievements in reducing poverty, serious development challenges are posed by income and non-income inequality and pockets of poverty, particularly among ethnic minorities.

Despite this there are many example of successful trade and investment opportunities in this emerging economy.

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Disclaimer: The information and materials contained in this document have been prepared for information purposes only and are general in nature. The information contained in this document is based on material compiled from data considered to be reliable at the time of publication. However information and opinions expressed in this document should not be construed as final consideration for any business and investment decision making. Sarmat Research Partners Pty Ltd cannot be held responsible for any losses whether direct or indirect as a result of using this information.


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Timor Leste

2014 Trade and Investment Profile


Timor-Leste is a small, developing nation that occupies half of the island of Timor located between Indonesia and Australia. As one of the world’s youngest democracies, it has boasted one of the world’s fastest-growing economies, buoyed by revenues from its modest petroleum resources.

Despite this, it remains a country with enormous poverty, and high unemployment rates and incomplete infrastructure, especially in health and education.

Oil and gas revenues have surged in recent years as projects in the Joint Petroleum Development Area that Timor-Leste shares with Australia have come online. The government set up a sovereign Petroleum Fund to ensure the sustainable use of its revenues over the long term. Government spending is mostly financed by withdrawals from the Fund.

Government spending, largely on infrastructure and social transfers, drives economic growth. Private sector development has been slow due to human capital shortages, an incomplete and bureaucratic regulatory environment, and basic infrastructure inadequacies.

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Disclaimer: The information and materials contained in this document have been prepared for information purposes only and are general in nature. The information contained in this document is based on material compiled from data considered to be reliable at the time of publication. However information and opinions expressed in this document should not be construed as final consideration for any business and investment decision making. Sarmat Research Partners Pty Ltd cannot be held responsible for any losses whether direct or indirect as a result of using this information.


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Thailand

2014 Trade and Investment Profile


The Kingdom of Thailand is located on the western side of the Indochina Peninsula. It faces the Andaman Sea and the Union of Myanmar to the west, Laos and Cambodia to the north and east, and Malaysia to the south.

With its strategic geopolitical position and significance as the second largest economy in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Thailand plays a major role in promoting regional cooperation and integration. Having attained upper middle income status based on services and manufacturing. As one of the world’s largest exporters of semiconductor components and devices, electrical goods, solar panels, and information and communication technology (ICT) products, the country aspires to reach higher-income status within the next two decades.

However, since the late 1990s, economic growth in Thailand has been impeded by global economic shocks, natural disasters, socio-political tensions, and relatively low investment. Other challenges to growth have included persistent inequality, environmental degradation, and an aging population.

With well-developed infrastructure, a free-enterprise economy, generally pro-investment policies, and strong export industries, Thailand is offers many investment opportunities.

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Disclaimer: The information and materials contained in this document have been prepared for information purposes only and are general in nature. The information contained in this document is based on material compiled from data considered to be reliable at the time of publication. However information and opinions expressed in this document should not be construed as final consideration for any business and investment decision making. Sarmat Research Partners Pty Ltd cannot be held responsible for any losses whether direct or indirect as a result of using this information.


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Taiwan

2014 Trade and Investment Profile


Taiwan, also known as Taipei, China, is an archipelago of 86 islands located 100 miles off the coast of China, with the largest, Taiwan Island, comprising almost 98% of the country’s land mass of 13,900 square miles.

Taiwan has had a complicated history. After the Chinese Communists defeated the Republic of China (ROC) forces in the Chinese Civil War (1945-1949), the Chiang Kai-shek’s Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) retreated to Taiwan and established the island as a base of operations to reclaim the Chinese mainland.

Taiwan’s political status is complicated by the controversy over the Republic of China’s existence as a state. Mainland China still hold a claim over what is collectively known as the Republic of Taiwan.

Despite its political history, Taiwan has transformed itself through decades of hard work to be a well-industrialised and mature economy and an important economic and trading centre with one of the world’s busiest ports in Kaohsiung.

As the world’s 24th largest economy, the 16th largest exporter, and the 16th largest importer in merchandise trade, Taiwan has a dynamic capitalist economy. But a heavy dependence on exports exposes the economy to fluctuations in world demand.

Taiwan, also known as Taipei, China, is an archipelago of 86 islands located 100 miles off the coast of China, with the largest, Taiwan Island, comprising almost 98% of the country’s land mass of 13,900 square miles.

Taiwan has had a complicated history. After the Chinese Communists defeated the Republic of China (ROC) forces in the Chinese Civil War (1945-1949), the Chiang Kai-shek’s Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) retreated to Taiwan and established the island as a base of operations to reclaim the Chinese mainland.

Taiwan’s political status is complicated by the controversy over the Republic of China’s existence as a state. Mainland China still hold a claim over what is collectively known as the Republic of Taiwan.

Despite its political history, Taiwan has transformed itself through decades of hard work to be a well-industrialised and mature economy and an important economic and trading centre with one of the world’s busiest ports in Kaohsiung.

As the world’s 24th largest economy, the 16th largest exporter, and the 16th largest importer in merchandise trade, Taiwan has a dynamic capitalist economy. But a heavy dependence on exports exposes the economy to fluctuations in world demand.

In 1991, Taiwan proposed a long-term, three-phase reunification plan with China, along with plans to restructure the government. Since then, growing economic ties highlight Taiwan’s importance as an emerging trace and investment gateway to mainland China.

Taiwan has overcome its physical limitations and challenges to remain one of the key economic centres in Asia and a major foreign investor and aid donor.

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Disclaimer: The information and materials contained in this document have been prepared for information purposes only and are general in nature. The information contained in this document is based on material compiled from data considered to be reliable at the time of publication. However information and opinions expressed in this document should not be construed as final consideration for any business and investment decision making. Sarmat Research Partners Pty Ltd cannot be held responsible for any losses whether direct or indirect as a result of using this information.


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Sri Lanka

2014 Trade and Investment Profile


The end of the civil war in 2009 has allowed Sri Lanka to focus on rebuilding the country’s economy and infrastructure. The government has set ambitious goals for economic development – aspiring to GDP growth rates over 8 percent and developing five economic hubs in ports, aviation, commerce, knowledge, and energy. Tourism is also attracting investment. With a relatively open investment climate and financial system, moderately stable monetary policy, improving infrastructure, and world-class local companies, Sri Lanka has many of the ingredients to progress economically. For foreign investors, Sri Lanka’s frontier market has been fertile ground for both direct and capital investments.

The principal risks to Sri Lanka’s economy is the small chance that political instability is brought upon the country again by a political minority. Beyond that, there are currency exchange risks for foreign investors and there is the risk that investing somewhere else could do better.

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Disclaimer: The information and materials contained in this document have been prepared for information purposes only and are general in nature. The information contained in this document is based on material compiled from data considered to be reliable at the time of publication. However information and opinions expressed in this document should not be construed as final consideration for any business and investment decision making. Sarmat Research Partners Pty Ltd cannot be held responsible for any losses whether direct or indirect as a result of using this information.


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